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Lost in mediocrity?

There is no cogitation to where it’s going wrong and changing the situation accordingly.

Are we as proud and gallant Bhutanese starting to lose ourselves in mediocrity? Or have complacency got the better of us that we take it as if it’s an answer to every debacle of ours?

Take for instance our qualifying games for the World Cup 2018. Bhutan earlier lost with 0-7 score in favor of Hongkong. A few weeks later, Bhutan was again humbled by China 0-6 here at Changlimithang stadium in Thimphu.

Not so much so about the fact that we lost or were beaten badly, but we had a myriad of comforting reasoning and explanations after the game. For Hongkong, the players didn’t appear that they were from there and we lost. And in the game against China, they were too tall or professional than the Bhutanese side. Or results were at least better than the one that we had then in the game against Kuwait.

The mere fact, however, is we lost. That we were defeated badly is a fait accompli. We need to accept this fact and then right the wrongs accordingly. The perceptions or the complacent nature that we have now will not suffice. We need to question ourselves. If lack of infrastructure and facilities are reasons for our soccer debacle, such facilities must be put in place. If the present perceptions that pursuing sports is not a career option, then it should be made into a promising career. If investment into sports has been minimal or lacking, increased investment must be made accordingly.

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The complacent perception that ‘we can only do this much’ appears to be not just confined to sports alone. If some of the country’s media are doing wrong and performing poorly, for example, the outright justification is ‘we can only expect this much from the media considering media being a fairly young development in Bhutan’.  There is no cogitation to where it’s going wrong and changing the situation accordingly.

And if our high school students are getting below average grades in English exams, it’s not surprising to hear some justification like ‘English is not our first language’. There is no cogitation to where it’s going wrong despite English language being the main mode of communication in the schooling system. There is nothing like what must be done to change the situation.

We must, therefore, realize that to change these many situations we first need to change ourselves. And to change ourselves effectively, we need to change these perceptions first.

Namkhai Norbu, Executive Director, Guide Association of Bhutan/ Lecturer, Royal Thimphu College


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